When You Reach Me
published in 2010

Description

Amazon Best of the Month, July 2009: Shortly after sixth-grader Miranda and her best friend Sal part ways, for some inexplicable reason her once familiar world turns upside down. Maybe it's because she's caught up in reading A Wrinkle in Time and trying to understand time travel, or perhaps it's because she's been receiving mysterious notes which accurately predict the future. Rebecca Stead's poignant novel, When You Reach Me, captures the interior monologue and observations of kids who are starting to recognize and negotiate the complexities of friendship and family, class and identity. Set in New York City in 1979, the story takes its cue from beloved Manhattan tales for middle graders like E.L. Konigsburg's From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, Louise Fitzhugh's Harriet the Spy, and Norma Klein's Mom the Wolfman and Me. Like those earlier novels, When You Reach Me will stir the imaginations of young readers curious about day-to-day life in a big city. --Lauren Nemroff Amazon Exclusive: A Q&A with Rebecca Stead We had the opportunity to chat with Rebecca Stead over e-mail about her second novel, When You Reach Me. Here's what Rebecca had to say about growing up in New York City, meeting Madeleine L'Engle, and how writing a novel is a lot like solving a puzzle. Amazon.com: When You Reach Me captures Manhattan in the late 70s perfectly. Why did you choose to set a book for young readers today in the not-too-distant (but very different) past? Rebecca Stead: I grew up in New York in the seventies and eighties. When I was in elementary school, I became acquainted with a mysterious sort of character, who I wanted to use for this story. When I began to write about him, I was suddenly remembering all kinds of details and moments and places from my own childhood and happily writing them into the book. And in this way the book's setting sort of rose up around the plot. There's another reason I set the story in the past, which is that I wanted to show a world of kids with a great deal of autonomy, and I wasn't sure that it would ring true in a modern New York setting. For better or for worse, life is different now. Amazon.com: Madeleine L'Engle's classic A Wrinkle in Time plays an important role in When You Reach Me. Why did you choose pay homage to this particular classic in your own book? Rebecca Stead: I loved A Wrinkle in Time as a child. I didn't know why I loved it, and I didn't want to know why. I remember meeting Madeleine L'Engle once at a bookstore and just staring at her as if she were a magical person. What I love about L'Engle's book now is how it deals with so much fragile inner-human stuff at the same time that it takes on life's big questions. There's something fearless about this book. It started out as a small detail in Miranda's story, a sort of talisman, and one I thought I would eventually jettison, because you can't just toss A Wrinkle in Time in there casually. But as my story went deeper, I saw that I didn't want to let the book go. I talked about it with my editor, Wendy Lamb, and to others close to the story. And what we decided was that if we were going to bring L'Engle's story in, we needed to make the book's relationship to Miranda's story stronger. So I went back to A Wrinkle in Time and read it again and again, trying to see it as different characters in my own story might (sounds crazy, but it's possible!). And those readings led to new connections. Amazon.com: I love the way you incorporate hints of science fiction into the ordinary events of Miranda's life. What scientific possibilities (or realities) did you find most interesting growing up? Rebecca Stead: I thought about time a lot when I was a kid. Not in a mystical way--it was just the passing of time, the idea of time stretching out forever, that interested me. I used to wonder, "What will my room look like on my thirtieth birthday? What will be the first words I say in the year 2000? When I'm forty, will I remember the 'me' I am now? Will I remember this moment?" I guess part of it was thinking about how we leave ourselve...